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Drama and Theatre Studies AS & A level at Stowupland High School

Course description

The course will teach you a very wide range of practical, creative and communication skills. You will develop your powers of analysis, your ability to be resourceful and solve problems.  You will enrich your mind with knowledge about plays, ideas, theatre practitioners, and about human beings, both as individuals and in society.  You will learn how to be an effective team member, helping to inspire and be inspired by others. 

Entry requirements

It is normally expected that a student will have a GCSE grade C or above in Drama, but students can – and often do, with great success – take ‘A’ level Drama without having studied it at GCSE  level. Good GCSE grades in English, History, Art or Design, for example, can help prepare for the Drama course and are seen as appropriate qualifications. 

Assessment

AS level has a straightforward and easily accessible structure with two components:

Component 1: Exploration and Performance    (AS 60%; 96 marks)

You will be involved as a performer or designer in a group performance of one key extract from a performance text, informed by the ideas of one practitioner.  You will also be involved as a performer or designer in a monologue or duologue of one key extract from a different performance text.  As a centre, we have the freedom of choice with our texts to meet your individual needs and abilities.  This work is internally assessed and externally moderated.

There are three parts: a portfolio, for which you can give either written evidence or recorded/verbal evidence; the group performance/design realization; the monologue/duologue (or design element). 

Component 2: Theatre Makers in Practice    (AS 40%; 48 marks) 

This is a written exam, which puts practical work at the heart of the experience by asking you to write about how you would perform roles or design for certain scenes.  There are clear and straightforward question papers.  Section A is a Live Theatre Evaluation, worth 16 marks, in which you will write about a live performance which we will have seen together in a theatre.  You are allowed to take 500 words of notes into the exam.  Section B is called ‘Page to Stage’ and asks you to write about how you would bring a performance text to life.  This is focused on an extract from a play you have studied and the extract is provided for you.

 

A2 level is also clear and accessible.  It builds on and extends the learning you will have completed at AS Level.

Component 1: Devising    (40% A Level; 80 marks)

In this exciting unit, you devise an original piece of theatre (in a group of 3-6 students), using an extract from a performance text as a starting point.  You will also combine this with reference to one practitioner.  As a centre, we have a free choice of plays and practitioners, so these will be carefully selected to meet your needs and abilities.  You can work as either a performer or as a designer.

There are two parts: a portfolio (60 marks), which can be handwritten or typed; or a recorded presentation or spoken recording; or a mixture of both written and spoken evidence.  Then there is the performance in which you will be a   performer or a designer (20 marks).

Component 2: Text in Performance    (20% A Level; 60 marks)

You will be involved as a performer or designer in the performance of one key extract from a performance text and as a performer or designer in a monologue or duologue from a difference performance text.  As a centre, we have free choice of plays, so we can select texts to fit your individual needs and abilities.  These performances are externally moderated by a visiting examiner.

Component 3: Theatre Makers in Practice    (40% A Level; 80 marks)

This is a written exam, with clear and straightforward questions.  In Section A, you will write a Live Theatre Evaluation of a play we will have seen and studied together.  For this, you can take 500 words of notes into the exam.  In section B, ‘Page to Stage’, you will also write about another play which we will have studied together and considered in relation to a practitioner.  In Section C, you will write about your own creative ideas, imagining how you would present a set play for a contemporary audience.  For this last question, you can  take in an unmarked copy of the play. 

Future opportunities

Your learning will prepare you for further study of the subject at college or university, for a role in the performance and entertainment industry or for a wide variety of other forms of employment which require team-work, self-confidence, clear and effective communication, creative thinking, problem-solving and contact with the public. 

How to apply

If you want to apply for this course, you will need to contact Stowupland High School directly.

Last updated date: 07 September 2016
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Key information

  • Start date: Next September

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