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Geography A level (See Option Blocks on our website) at Notre Dame High School

Course description

This course will appeal to those students who: -

  • Have an interest in and concern for the environment

  • Are interested in current affairs

  • Enjoy studying a subject that is relevant to their own lives and experiences

  • Want the opportunity to carry out practical work outdoors as well as classwork

  • Enjoy independent learning and research, as well as whole class teaching, and group work.

  • Want to broaden their A-level studies to cover both ‘sciences’ and ‘humanities’

  • Enjoy travel and finding out about new people, places, landscapes and events

  • Want to keep their options open – Geography A-level is an appropriate qualification for a very wide range of higher education or career choices.

  • Want to keep options open for university applications. Geography is one of the facilitating subjects at A-Level.

     

    During Y12 all students will go on a residential fieldwork visit to either Cumbria or the Yorkshire Dales (location TBC). The field course provides the opportunity to study several aspects of the A-level course using real world examples. It also provides the essential fieldwork experience required for the Independent Investigations coursework as well as fieldwork related questions on the other examinations. In recent years we have also been able to offer students the option of participation in overseas field study visits to locations such as Iceland, The Amalfi Coast, and Sicily.

Course content

What will I learn?

  • What are the forces influencing our natural environment – the landscapes, the plants and animals and the weather and climate?

  • What are the issues affecting people and the places where they live? How are cities and the countryside changing? Why are they changing?

  • How are people affecting the environment we all live in? What are the opportunities, the challenges and the constraints?

  • What are the economic forces that drive the world economy and how they are changing?

  • What decisions are being made about the use and management of resources and who makes these decisions?

  • An appreciation of current events and world problems such as the effects of natural hazards and the plight of refugees.

  • How to plan a fieldwork investigation. The collection of primary and secondary data and how to analyse it in a variety of forms for a coursework investigation.

  • Develop the ability to make links and connections across a wide variety of topics.

  • Gain experience of all six key skills.

     


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Entry requirements

What do I need?

 

It is not necessarily a requirement that you should have studied Geography at GCSE in order to take an A-level course in the subject, although inevitably most students will have done. Several topics covered in the course are developments of work covered at GCSE, but others are new. What is more important is that you should have a lively and enquiring mind, an interest in the environment and current affairs, a willingness to explore new ideas and an ability to communicate your ideas effectively.

 

Those students who have studied GCSE Geography will find that the material and the skills they have learned will prove a valuable foundation for further studies at this level. If you have studied Geography at GCSE you should have achieved at least grade C or a 4 in the new GCSE measurements. If you have not studied Geography previously we will look

(See Option Blocks on our website)

 

Assessment

How will I be assessed?

 

 

Edexcel GCE Geography

 

Paper 1 (Paper code: 9GE0/01)

Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes

30% of the qualification

105 marks

 

Content overview1

● Area of study 1, Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards

● Area of study 1, Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change including

Glaciated Landscapes and Change

● Area of study 3, Topic 5: The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity

● Area of study 3, Topic 6: The Carbon Cycle and Energy Security

 

Assessment overview

An externally-assessed written examination comprising three sections.

Section A relates to Topic 1: Tectonic Processes and Hazards.

Section B relates to Topic 2: Landscape Systems, Processes and Change

Section C relates to Topic 5: The Water Cycle and Water Insecurity and Topic 6: The Carbon

Cycle and Energy Security.

 

The examination may include short open, open response and resource-linked questions. The

examination includes 12-mark and 20-mark extended writing questions. Calculators may be used.

 

 

 

Paper 2 (Paper code: 9GE0/02)

Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes

30% of the qualification

105 marks

 

Content overview1

● Area of study 2, Topic 3: Globalisation

● Area of study 2, Topic 4: Shaping Places – including Regenerating Places

● Area of study 4, Topic 7: Superpowers

● Area of study 4, Topic 8: Global Development and Connections – including Migration, Identity and Sovereignty.

 

Assessment overview

An externally-assessed written examination comprising three sections.

Section A relates to Topics 3 and 7: Globalisation / Superpowers.

Section B relates to Topic 4: Shaping Places.

Section C relates to Topic 8: Global Development and Connections.

 

The examination may include short open, open response and resource-linked questions. The

examination includes 12-mark and 20-mark extended writing questions. Calculators may be used.

 

 

Paper 3 (*Paper code: 9GE0/03)

Written examination: 2 hours and 15 minutes

20% of the qualification

70 marks

 

Content overview

The specification contains three synoptic themes within the compulsory1 content areas:

● Players

● Attitudes and actions

● Futures and uncertainties.

The synoptic investigation will be based on a geographical issue within a place-based context that

links to the three synoptic themes and is rooted in two or more of the compulsory content areas.

 

Assessment overview

An externally-assessed written examination. A resource booklet will contain information about the

geographical issue.

Sections A, B and C all draw synoptically on knowledge and understanding from compulsory

content drawn from different parts of the course.

The examination may include short open, open response and resource-linked questions. The

examination includes 8-mark, 18-mark and 24-mark extended writing questions. Calculators may

be used.

 

 

Coursework: Independent Investigation (9GE0/04)

Non-examined assessment

20% of the qualification

70 marks

Content overview

● The student defines a question or issue for investigation, relating to the compulsory or optional content. The topic may relate to any aspect of geography contained within the specification.

● The student’s investigation will incorporate fieldwork data (collected individually or as part of a group) and own research and/or secondary data.

● The fieldwork, which forms the focus and context of the individual investigation, may be either human, physical or integrated physical-human.

● The investigation report will evidence independent analysis and evaluation of data, presentation of data findings and extended writing.

● Students will be expected to show evidence that they have used both quantitative and

qualitative data to support their independent investigation as appropriate to the particular

environment and/or location.

 

Assessment overview

● The investigation report is internally assessed and externally moderated.

● The student will produce a written report of 3000–4000 words.

Future opportunities

If you have studied Geography you will have the following advantages: -

  • You will have developed skills such as using maps, photographs and diagrams, explaining your ideas clearly to others.
  • You will be aware of events around you and appreciate that people have different views and there are different solutions to issues.

 

Career options with Geography include jobs which involve: -

  • Using maps and data
  • Knowing about the environment
  • Making decisions about location
  • Sustainable management of resources and environments
  • Working with people

 

 

Examples: -

  • Air traffic controller, archaeologist, architect, cartographer, civil engineer, conservationist, estate agent, environmentalist, farm worker, financial adviser, foreign correspondent, geologist, geophysicist, GIS technician, graphic designer, holiday rep, hotel manager, hydrologist, landscaper, meteorologist, outdoor pursuits supervisor, peacekeeper, planner, social worker, surveyor, taxi driver, teacher, transport manager, translator and travel agent.

 

For further information about why Geography is a sound career choice and to read biographies of geographers, visit the Geographical Association website, which includes a link to The Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) website.

Further information

 

If you have studied Geography you will have the following advantages: -

  • You will have developed skills such as using maps, photographs and diagrams, explaining your ideas clearly to others.
  • You will be aware of events around you and appreciate that people have different views and there are different solutions to issues.

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS Progress. Add this course to your favourites so you can start making an application.

Last updated date: 28 November 2018
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