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Sociology A level at Wilberforce College

Course description

The fascination of sociology lies in the fact that it makes us see, in a new light, the very world in which we have lived all our lives. It can be said that the first wisdom of sociology is things are not what they seem. If you have a curiosity about human beings and their lives you will find sociology interesting and rewarding. Sociology prepares you for a lifetime of change, developing an appreciation of diversity, love of learning, writing and study skills, as well as a knowledge base about human behaviour, social organisation, and culture.

If you are the type who doesn’t necessarily follow the crowd (but are fascinated by their behaviour), the type who is truly interested in what is going on in the world, then sociology should interest you. Sociology will help you understand the connection between culture, identity and behaviour, and why people stereotype and judge each other. It will help you to understand how society affects our life chances and futures.

Course content

Units of study:

1. Socialisation, culture and identity

Component 1 introduces you to the key themes of socialisation, culture and identity and develops these themes through the context of one of three options. These options develop skills that enable you to focus on their personal identity, roles and responsibilities within society and to develop a lifelong interest in social issues.

SECTION A: INTRODUCING SOCIALISATION, CULTURE AND IDENTITY
What is culture?
What is socialisation?
What is identity?

SECTION B: OPTION
Youth subcultures

2. Researching and understanding social inequalities

You will gain knowledge and understanding of contemporary social processes and social change in the context of social inequality and difference. You will develop understanding of the links between the nature of sociological thought and the methods of sociological enquiry.

SECTION A: RESEARCH METHODS AND RESEARCHING SOCIAL INEQUALITIES
What is the relationship between theory and methods?
What are the main stages of the research process?
Which methods are used in sociological research?

SECTION B: UNDERSTANDING SOCIAL INEQUALITIES
What are the main patterns and trends in social inequality and difference?
How can patterns and trends in social inequality and difference be explained?

3. Debates in contemporary society

The relationship between globalisation and digital forms of communication.
The impact of digital forms of communication in a global context.

SECTION A:
This section provides you with the opportunity to consider developments in digital forms of communication within global society and how these developments are related to social capital. You will gain an overview of how Marxists, feminists and postmodernists view digital forms of communication and the impact of digital social communication – whether this is on people’s identity, social inequalities or relationships. You will also consider the impact on culture in terms of conflict and change, cultural homogenisation and culture defense.

SECTION B:
Crime and deviance ( this also includes a global aspect)

Entry requirements

Five A* - C grades at GCSE including a minimum of grade C in GCSE English Language.

Assessment

You will take a mock examination at the end of your first year of study. These examinations will be based on the content you have learned in year one. You will take 3 examinations at the end of year two based on the full two years of work. These are the only examinations that count towards the final A level grade.

How to apply

If you want to apply for this course, you will need to contact Wilberforce College directly.

Last updated date: 06 September 2016

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