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French A level at The Rodillian Academy

Course description

The A-level specification builds on the knowledge, understanding and skills gained at GCSE. The focus on how French-speaking society has been shaped, socially and culturally, and how it continues to change. In the first year, aspects of the social context are studied, together with aspects of the artistic life of French-speaking countries. In the second year further aspects of the social background are covered, this time focusing on issues, such as life for those on the margins of French-speaking society as well as looking at the positive influences that diversity brings. Students also study aspects of the political landscape in a French-speaking country, looking at immigration from the political perspective and at the way in which political power is expressed through action such as strikes and demonstrations. Teenagers and the extent to which they are politically engaged looks towards the future of political life in French-speaking society. Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of themes relating to the culture and society of countries where French is spoken, and their language skills. They will do this by using authentic spoken and written sources in French.
The following themes and sub-themes will be covered over the course of the A-Level:
Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends
• The changing nature of family (La famille en voie de changement)
• The 'cyber-society' (La « cyber-société »)
• The place of voluntary work (Le rôle du bénévolat)
Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues
• Positive features of a diverse society (Les aspects positifs d'une société diverse)
• Life for the marginalised (Quelle vie pour les marginalisés ? )
• How criminals are treated (Comment on traite les criminels)
Political and artistic culture
Students must study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one French-speaking country. 1 Artistic culture in the French-speaking world
• A culture proud of its heritage (Une culture fière de son patrimoine)
• Contemporary francophone music (La musique francophone contemporaine)
• Cinema: the 7th art form (Cinéma : le septième art)
Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world
• Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment (Les ados, le droit de vote et l'engagement politique)
• Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power? (Manifestations, grèves – à qui le pouvoir ? )
• Politics and immigration (La politique et l'immigration)
Grammar
In the exam students will be required to use, actively and accurately, grammar and structures appropriate to the tasks set

Course content

The A-level specification builds on the knowledge, understanding and skills gained at GCSE. The focus on how French-speaking society has been shaped, socially and culturally, and how it continues to change. In the first year, aspects of the social context are studied, together with aspects of the artistic life of French-speaking countries. In the second year further aspects of the social background are covered, this time focusing on issues, such as life for those on the margins of French-speaking society as well as looking at the positive influences that diversity brings. Students also study aspects of the political landscape in a French-speaking country, looking at immigration from the political perspective and at the way in which political power is expressed through action such as strikes and demonstrations. Teenagers and the extent to which they are politically engaged looks towards the future of political life in French-speaking society. Students will develop their knowledge and understanding of themes relating to the culture and society of countries where French is spoken, and their language skills. They will do this by using authentic spoken and written sources in French.
The following themes and sub-themes will be covered over the course of the A-Level:
Aspects of French-speaking society: current trends
• The changing nature of family (La famille en voie de changement)
• The 'cyber-society' (La « cyber-société »)
• The place of voluntary work (Le rôle du bénévolat)
Aspects of French-speaking society: current issues
• Positive features of a diverse society (Les aspects positifs d'une société diverse)
• Life for the marginalised (Quelle vie pour les marginalisés ? )
• How criminals are treated (Comment on traite les criminels)
Political and artistic culture
Students must study the themes and sub-themes below in relation to at least one French-speaking country. 1 Artistic culture in the French-speaking world
• A culture proud of its heritage (Une culture fière de son patrimoine)
• Contemporary francophone music (La musique francophone contemporaine)
• Cinema: the 7th art form (Cinéma : le septième art)
Aspects of political life in the French-speaking world
• Teenagers, the right to vote and political commitment (Les ados, le droit de vote et l'engagement politique)
• Demonstrations, strikes – who holds the power? (Manifestations, grèves – à qui le pouvoir ? )
• Politics and immigration (La politique et l'immigration)
Grammar
In the exam students will be required to use, actively and accurately, grammar and structures appropriate to the tasks set

Entry requirements

Students must have achieved a minimum of 5 GCSEs grade C or above from different subjects, including English and Maths. Grade C or above in French is also required

Assessment

There are three examinations which will be completed at the end of the two year course.

Paper 1 – Listening, Reading and Writing. Written exam 2 hours 30 minutes (40% of the A-Level):
This paper covers all of the themes and sub-themes listed above and is split into four sections.

  • Pupils are expected to listen and respond to spoken passages from a range of contexts and sources covering different registers and adapted as necessary. All questions are in French, to be answered with non-verbal responses or in French (60 marks)
  • Pupils are expected to read and respond to a variety of texts written for different purposes, drawn from a range of authentic sources and adapted as necessary.  All questions are in French, to be answered with non-verbal responses or in French (60 marks)
  • Translation into English; a passage of minimum 100 words (20 marks)
  • Translation into French; a passage of minimum 100 words (20 marks).

Paper 2 – Writing. Written exam 2 hours (30% of the A-Level)
Pupils will write two essays in French (approximately 300 words per essay). One essay will be on the text studied (Joseph Joffo – Un sac de billes) and one essay will be on the film studied (La Haine).

Paper 3 – Speaking. 21-23 minutes (30% of the A-Level)
Discussion of a sub-theme with the discussion based on a stimulus card (5–6 minutes). The student studies the card for 5 minutes at the start of the test (25 marks).
Presentation (2 minutes) and discussion (9–10 minutes) of individual research project (35 marks).

Future opportunities

By studying a language, students are able to enhance their future employment possibilities. They will have an in depth insight into another culture and society which will help them, not only with their communication skills, but also their interpersonal skills. Students will be able to demonstrate that they are able to work well in a team and that they have good problem-solving skills. They will be able to show that they can be open-minded and confident. The course provides students with a sound basis for further study at University by developing their written communication and their independent learning skills.

How to apply

You can apply for this course through UCAS Progress. Add this course to your favourites so you can start making an application.

Last updated date: 16 November 2015
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Key information

  • Start date: Next September
  • Duration: 2 Years

Contact details

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