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A Level Chemistry at The Bishop of Winchester Academy

Course description

Chemistry is a vital science. It is the study of materials based on the properties of atoms and the way that these atoms can be combined. Without Chemistry, there could not have been any new drug development, new dyes, agrochemicals, plastics, computers or spacecraft. We would have a much poorer understanding of the world, from the way that our bodies work, to the effects of human activity on the environment. Chemistry is at the cutting edge of new technology.

Course content

Chemistry addresses a wide range of questions:

  • why do chemical reactions occur?
  • how quickly do they occur? What factors affect their speed?
  • how do electrons affect properties of materials?
  • how can industrial processes be improved to give better yields or to occur faster?
  • how do the properties of materials depend on the elements they contain?
  • why is carbon the basis of life?
  • what is damaging the environment and what can be done?

Entry requirements

Students must meet the standard 6th Form entry criteria.  Students should preferably have an A grade (or above) in the associated GCSE single science. Students who have a GCSE double science qualification should have an A grade (or above), although those with a high B grade will be considered.

Assessment

The assessment pattern for both AS and A2 are similar. Two of the three units are externally assessed through written exams. The third unit is the practical skills unit and is teacher assessed.

Future opportunities

Demand for people with qualifications in Chemistry is high. Chemistry graduates are sought after to work on industrial and academic research, in the chemical industry, in the financial world, in management and in many other areas where numeracy and other problem solving skills are valued.

How to apply

If you want to apply for this course, you will need to contact The Bishop of Winchester Academy directly.

Last updated date: 04 June 2015

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